Skip to content

bosch ke jetronic injection

You search PDF repair manual about bosch ke jetronic injection, if there are search results will appear below. If search results do not exist, please search by others keyword.

1988 Mercedes Benz 260E KE-Jetronic (CIS-E) Injection System Description and Operation Manual

download
A mechanical hydraulic injection system provides the basis for the Bosch KE-Jetronic (CIS-E) fuel system. The mechanical portion of the CIS-E system consists of the mixture control unit (air flow meter and fuel distributor ), primary pressure regulator, fuel accumulator , cold start valve , fuel injectors, pumps, filter, lines, tank and fuel cooler . In addition, electrical controls have been added for increased flexibility to meet todays more stringent performance and exhaust emission requirements. Refer to “COMPUTERIZED ENGINE CONTROLS” for a detailed description of electronic components. Air/Fuel Metering The basic function of the KE-Jetronic system is to meter fuel to the engine dependent upon the quantity of air drawn in by the engine (which is the main actuating variable). The stream of air drawn in by the engine deflects the sensor plate, which in turn actuates the fuel-metering plunger. Depending upon its position, the plunger opens or closes the fuel-metering slits. The metering slits supply fuel through the differential pressure valves to the individual fuel injectors. In contrast to the K-Jetronic system, the KE-Jetronic system also takes a number of additional engine operating data into account by means of sensors. The output signals from these sensors are processed by the KE-Jetronic electronic control unit which controls the electro-hydraulic actuator which adapts the injected fuel quantity to the various operating conditions. In the event of a system malfunction, the KE-Jetronic system operates solely with the basic function (CIS), and the driver then has a system at his disposal which provides a good limp-home capability when the engine is warm

Rotary Fuel Pumps Timing to engine steps

download
SMALL | MEDIUM | LARGE Previous Next Fuel Injection Pump (Distributor Type) The fuel injection pumps, Bosch® VE, Lucas CAV DPA, Stanadyne DB4, Lucas CAV DPS, and Delphi DP210, are rotary distributor pumps. These pumps perform the four basic functions of: 1. Producing the high fuel pressure required for injection 2. Metering the exact amount of fuel for each injection cycle 3. Distributing the high-pressure, metered fuel to each cylinder at the precise time 4. Varying the timing relative to engine speed. SMALL | MEDIUM | LARGE Previous Next Distributor-Type Pump Governor Balance between the governor flyweights and control lever position controls the metering of the amount of fuel to be injected. The fuel injection pump governor performance and setting can affect engine power. Special equipment and qualified personnel are required to verify governor performance. If the seals are broken on the external Bosch® VE adjustment screw, the fuel rate can, perhaps, be out of adjustment The Lucas CAV DPA/DPS fuel injection pump uses a coded spring connection to change the governor setting. Incorrect connection of the governor spring can affect performance. Adjustments and rating changes are described in the Master Repair Manual, Injector Pumps and Injectors, Manual Shutdown Levers Both fuel injection pumps are equipped with mechanical shutdown levers. These levers are spring-loaded in the run position. Not all applications will use these manual shutdown controls and there will be no cable or rod connected to the lever. NOTE: Partial actuation of the mechanical shutdown levers will affect fuel flow and engine power. SMALL | MEDIUM | LARGE Previous Next Advance Timing Mechanism Regulated pressure produced by a vane supply pump in both fuel injection pumps is used to advance the timing as the engine speed increases. A return spring is used to retard the timing as the engine speed is reduced. If a spring breaks, the timing will go to the advance position, resulting in torque loss, fuel knock, and possible engine overheating. Retarded (late) timing will result in torque loss, high fuel consumption, and white to black smoke. SMALL | MEDIUM | LARGE Previous Next The Lucas CAV DPA/DPS advance timing mechanism uses a check ball in the circuit which, if omitted during assembly, will result in no timing advance. If the fuel injection pump has been replaced or the mechanism has been removed to fix a leak, the problem can be that the check ball is missing

1984-1995 Honda Accord/Prelude In­Tank Fuel Pumps TEST/REPAIR MANUAL

download
Carbureted Fuel System GENERAL INFORMATION On these vehicles, the engine management system is considered part of the emission control system. The major components include the carburetor(s), feedback control system, the air injection system, a throttle control system and the EGR system. The system consists of sensors and switches that feed information to the Electronic Control Unit (ECU), which will then operate several solenoid valves to maintain the ideal air/fuel ratio under all conditions. As useful as the tests found in this section are, the first step in repair or service to engine management systems is still to gain as much information as possible about the problem; when and under what conditions it occurs. At highway speed? At idle only? Only under heavy load or hard acceleration? Wet weather? Defining the problem will eliminate many systems from consideration and possibly point to the affected system. Before diving into an extended electrical diagnosis, take the time to review the basics. Check every vacuum line for cracks or leaks. Check every electrical connector for corrosion or loose pins. Quite often, simply unplugging and reconnecting a connector will break up corrosion on the pins and restore the circuit. Watch out for poor grounds, particularly if the car has experienced major bodywork. COMPONENT TESTING Air Injection System The purpose of this system is to supply oxygen to the exhaust stream at a point in the exhaust manifold that is hot enough to burn off some of the hydrocarbon emissions. The main component is an air suction valve. The valve is spring loaded to stay closed, with engine vacuum supplied to a diaphragm that reduces the spring pressure and allows the reeds to open. The ECU regulates the engine vacuum to the diaphragm by operating a solenoid valve. 1. With the engine at normal operating temperature and at idle, remove the air cleaner and listen for a bubbling sound at the air suction port. There should be no sound at idle, meaning the air suction valve is closed. 2. If the noise is heard at the air suction port, disconnect the vacuum hose at the air suction valve and connect a vacuum gauge to the hose. There should be no vacuum. If there is vacuum and the noise stops, the problem is in the control system. If there is no vacuum and the bubbling sound is still there, the air suction valve is defective and must be replaced. 3. To test the valve, draw a vacuum at the air suction valve diaphragm and listen for a bubbling sound at the air suction port. If no sound is heard, the air suction valve or diaphragm is faulty. Throttle Control System

1993 BMW 325i (E36) Removing and Installing/ Replacing Heater and Air Conditioning Fan (M50, S50, M52)

download
With Air Conditioning Notes Removing and Installing/Replacing Heater and Air Conditioning Fan (M50, S50, M52) * Additional work on 2-door model: Remove console for the windshield wiper system. * Position windscreen wiper, left, vertically. * Pull off rubber part and pry out grill. Zoom Sized for Print Zoom Sized for Print * Remove screws from cable channel. * Remove screws on right-hand side and take off holder. * Unscrew left-hand screw. * Pull out air collector in upwards direction. Note: Air collector will be difficult to pull out. M50, M52 Unclip covers. Unscrew bolts. Remove cover of injection-valve plate. * Unclip covers and remove screws. * Remove cover * Unfasten clips and remove blower cover. * Disconnect connector. * Unfasten clips and lift out left upper section of blower. Note: The air conditioning system remains installed. Illustration shows air conditioning unit removed.

1989-1996 Dodge Dakota Trucks COIL Ignition Tests Manual

download
Dakota Trucks 1989-1996 Ignition Tests COIL The ignition coil for the vehicles covered by this guide is in the following locations: • 1989-92 engines: mounted to the firewall • 1993-96 2.5L engines: mounted on the thermostat housing in front of the coolant temperature sensor • 1993-96 V6 and V8 LDC engines: mounted to a bracket bolted to the right engine cylinder head • 1993-96 5.9L HDC engines: mounted to a bracket bolted to the air injection pump (AIR pump) mounting bracket. Fig. 2: Ignition coil mounting-all 1989-92 models Fig. 3: Ignition coil wiring and mounting hardware-1993- 96 2.5L engine 1. Inspect the ignition coil for arcing while the engine is running. If the engine will not start, this can be performed while the engine is cranked by either an assistant or a remote starter. Look at the coil in dim or low light to aid visibility of any arcing. Fig. 4: Ignition coil mounting-1993-96 3.9L and 5.2L/5.9L LDC engines 2. Arcing at the tower will carbonize the wire boot, which, if it is connected to a new ignition coil, will cause the coil to fail. In such cases, clean all the carbonization away or replace the components as necessary. Fig. 5: Ignition coil mounting-1993-96 5.9L HDC engine 3. Using a coil tester or ohmmeter according to the manufacturer’s instructions, test the primary and secondary resistance. Replace any coil that does not meet the specifications indicated in the accompanying chart. 4. Inspect the secondary coil wire for any sign of damage. Replace if any damage is found. Carbon tracking on the old wire can cause arcing and the failure of a new ignition coil. REMOVAL & INSTALLATION 1989-92 Models See Figures 6 and 7 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Disconnect the three wires from the coil. Mark them to identify for installation. Fig. 6: Remove the coil bracket bolt at the cowl Fig. 7: Unscrew the coil mounting hardware, then remove the coil from the vehicle 3. Unplug the condenser suppressor connector from the coil, if equipped. 4. Unbolt and remove the coil. To install: 5. Bolt down the coil with old bolts. 6. Connect wires to coil making sure that the proper wires are connected where they should be. 7. Connect the condenser suppressor, if equipped. 8. Connect the battery negative cable Removal and Installation V6 AND V8 ENGINES 1. Disconnect the negative battery cable. 2. Disconnect the primary wiring from the ignition coil. 3. Disconnect the secondary spark plug wire from the coil. 4. Remove the two bolts and withdraw the coil from its mounting bracket. To install:
5. Position the coil on its bracket and install the two bolts. Tighten them to 100 inch lbs. (11 Nm). If the bracket has been tapped for coil mounting bolts, these fasteners require less torque, so tighten them to 50 inch lbs. (5 Nm). 6. Connect all wiring to the ignition coil. TESTING See Figure 1 The only test you can perform without a DRBII scan tool, or equivalent, is a basic check of the sensor only.